crimesmash1

crimesmash

Publisher: Trojan Magazines
Publication Dates: October 1950 – March 1953
Number of Issues Published: 15 (#1 – #15)
Color: Color
Dimensions: Standard Silver Age U. S.
Paper Stock: Glossy cover; Newsprint interior
Binding: Saddle-stitched
Publishing Format: Was Ongoing Series

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

Crime Smashers was first published by Trojan Magazines in October 1950, the series would run for 15 issues until March 1953. Crime Smashers featured four characters through out its entire run.

Dan Turner ‘Hollywood Detective’ was created by Robert Leslie Bellem, and made his debut in the pulp magazine Spicy Detective, dated June 1934. Many of the stories are set in and around the film industry, with the crimes involving those working in movies such as: film stars, agents and stuntmen. Bellem knew about the workings of Hollywood, having worked as a film extra. Many of the stories were written by Bellem, also involved were Kenneth W. Hutchinson and Adolphe Barreaux.

Apart from his regular inclusion in Crime Smashers, Dan Turner had his own title ‘Hollywood Detective’ of which 58 issues were published between January 1942 and October 1950. He has also appeared in two films, Blackmail produced by Republic Pictures in 1947, where he was portrayed by William Marshall and much later in 1990 he was played by Marc Singer, in The Raven Red Kiss-Off.

Sally the Sleuth was created by Adolphe Barreaux and made her first appearance in the pulp magazine Spicy Detective Stories, in November 1934. Sally was a plainclothes police detective, whose boss was simply known as ‘The Chief’. The stories generally entailed Sally losing most of her clothes and the Chief coming to her rescue.

The other two regular characters were Gail Ford ‘Girl Friday’ and Ray Hale ‘News Ace’ reporter for the ‘Clarion’. Apart from those mentioned above others who worked on Crime Smashers included: Myron Fass, who became one of the biggest pulp publishers in the 1970’s, John Romita Sr who ghosted for Lester Zakarin, Keats Pertree and Bill Walton.

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