elleryq1

Publisher: Ziff-Davis
Publication Dates: January, February & March 1952 – Summer 1952
Number of Issues Published: 2 (#1 – #2)
Color: Color
Dimensions: Standard Golden Age US
Paper Stock: Glossy Cover; Newsprint Interior
Binding: Saddle-stitched

Information thanks to the Grand Comics Database

Also 3 issues Dell Four Color Comics

Ellery Queen is both a fictional character and a pseudonym used by two American cousins from Brooklyn, New York—Daniel Nathan, alias Frederic Dannay (October 20, 1905 – September 3, 1982) and Emanuel Benjamin Lepofsky, alias Manfred Bennington Lee (January 11, 1905 – April 3, 1971)—to write, edit, and anthologize detective fiction. The fictional Ellery Queen created by Dannay and Lee is a mystery writer and amateur detective who helps his father, a New York City police inspector, solve baffling murders.

Ellery Queen was created in 1928 when Dannay and Lee entered a writing contest sponsored by McClure’s Magazine for the best first mystery novel. They decided to use as their collective pseudonym the same name that they had given their detective. Inspired by the formula and style of the Philo Vance novels by S. S. Van Dine, their entry won the contest, but before it could be published, the magazine closed. Undeterred, the cousins took their novel to other publishers, and The Roman Hat Mystery was published in 1929. According to H. R. F. Keating, “Later the cousins took a sharper view of the Philo Vance character, Manfred Lee calling him, with typical vehemence, ‘the biggest prig that ever came down the pike’.”

Comic books and graphic novels

Ellery Queen stories appeared in issues of Crackajack Funnies beginning in 1940, a four issue series by Superior Comics in 1949, two issues of a short-lived series by Ziff-Davis in 1952, and three comics published by Dell in 1962. Mike W. Barr used Ellery as a guest star in an issue of his Maze Agency #9 in February 1990, published by Innovation Comics, in a story titled “The English Channeler Mystery: A Problem in Deduction.”
Queen (the character) is highlighted in volume 11 of the Case Closed manga’s edition of “Gosho Aoyoma’s Mystery Library, a section of the graphic novels (usually the last page) where the author introduces a different detective (or occasionally, a villain) from mystery literature, television, or other media. The character Heiji Hattori also mentioned that he prefers Ellery Queen to Arthur Conan Doyle in volume 12.

1,2, Four Color Comic 1165,1243,1289





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